kptarlow

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  • #10672
    kptarlow
    Participant

    I thought I came equipped with one…incisors!

     

     ~ KPT

     

    #10784
    kptarlow
    Participant

    Deep slumps also require A LOT of babysitting to get it right. But yah – so far our best results have come with the way Paul described above. I’d love to hear if anyone else has had any other experiences! 

     

    ~ KPT

     

    #10633
    kptarlow
    Participant

    I prefer using adhesives to epoxies (less messy). However, I like BOTH E6000 & triolyse. But I’m cheap and E6000 is, too ;-) Seriously – the secrets to good adherence: absolutely rough up the surfaces and clean them well. You want to COVER the area of the bail, but only THINLY. A good way is to put a dab on the bail, squeeze it onto the cabochon. Some, but not a lot, should spill over the edges. If a lot comes out, you need to use less. The nice thing about E6000 is that once you give it plenty of time to cure (48 hours is good), then you can clean up the excess with a craft knife. With regard to waiting time – if you want a good bond, it needs to cure. Consider this  – Hextal (sp?) glass laminating glue takes over a week to cure!!

    If you are using triolyse – remember – give the solvent a good 30 seconds to evaporate after application before sticking the adhesive side to the solvent side. Again – a little, but not much, should squeeze out from the bail if you are using the right amount. After curing, it cleans up nicely with alcohol. Triolyse yellows – don’t use it on transparent pieces.

     

    Have a great day!

     

     ~ KPT

     

    #10766
    kptarlow
    Participant

    GlassCat –

    Getting those buggers the same length using a nipper is nearly impossible. I know it seems wasteful, but if you have access to a ringsaw, you’d have better luck that way. Then be sure to lightly grind and clean the sawed edge so it won’t be "schmutzy". Now – the realy challenge, in my mind, is getting them to fuse to each other. I sense those guys will not fuse together easily without being dammed together. Unless you do a full fuse and they are over 6mm tall…. Anyway, consider this…could you build them on a thin clear disk?

    Good luck!

     

    Have a great day!

     

     ~ KPT

     

    #10774
    kptarlow
    Participant

    Lisa –

    This is just beautiful! I love your style and the relic look of your pieces.

     

    Bravo!

     

     ~ KPT

     

    #10720
    kptarlow
    Participant

    Hi!

    Karen here…OK – so I’m not happy with this piece because of the SURFACE and I will slump it flat and lap it down and firepolish it and slump it again. HOWEVER, I am happy with what is below the surface. This is an example of the irid on irid technique. Indeed – iridescent coating is metallic and as such, it does not fuse to itself (this is all true for dichro, too). However, glass fuses to irid nicely. So…I did the resist thing on two pieces of irid – on one piece I did a wave pattern. On the other I did a swirl pattern. I sandblasted the irid off the rest of the glass not covered by the resist. I cleaned the pieces extraordinarily well. Then… I placed them irid to irid in the kiln (I also have the Winter collage glass on top of the two irid pieces). Every place the irids touch – they don’t stick, but the shimmer is awesome! Plus there is the subtle shimmer wherever there is just one layer of irid.

    Here is my attempt at photographing the differences up close (no easy task!)

    There it is!

    Have a great day!

     ~ KPT

     

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