Using kaiser-Lee Board instead of clay for molds

Home Forums Glassifieds Stuff for Sale Using kaiser-Lee Board instead of clay for molds

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  • #9967
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I have been studyng glass since 2008 and love it!  I work with Petra and Wolfgang Kaiser on Sanibel Island Fl. as well as at their studio in Cape Coral.

    We all use Kaiser-Lee board as our material of choice to create molds for our glass.    It is so easy to create molds for various pieces..they can be any size or shape we choose.  They can be reused over and over.  And the various pieces can be re-purposed constantly.    A clay mold has a specific shape and size and can only be used for that.  They tend to wear out and break.  Why doesn’t Kaiser-Lee Board have a wider use?

     

    #12922
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Because KLB is expensive. A single 1″ thick square foot piece is about $40.

    For that amount of money, I can buy two ready-to use, simillarly sized molds. I can also buy 4 times as much vermiculite board.

    Or, if I want something more versatile, I can spend $40 and for 100 pounds of clay.

    (Also, moving this thread to the “Stuff for Sale” forum since it seems more like an ad than a real topic.)



    Paul
    FusedGlass.Org
    Helios Kiln Glass Studio
    PaulTarlow.com

     

    #12923
    annrodman
    Participant

    Paul.. I don’t think your response was very fair.  For one thing it is unfair to move it to Stuff For Sale.  I wasn’t talking about cost..you were.  I’m not selling it.  Is cost the only reason that more people don’t use KLB?  I was trying to open up a discussion of KLB’s use.. who uses it; who doesn’t and why.  I hope your comments don’t effectively cut off any further discussion of KLB’s uses.

    For you to say that for $40. you could buy 2 clay molds begs the question.  I said that KLB seems to me to be more versatile than clay molds.  You can cut up that 12″X12″ piece of KLB and create many, many different molds in different sizes and shapes.  You can use and reuse it.

    And your comment that for $40 you can buy 100 pounds of clay is supercillious at best.  Once you have that 100# of clay.. then what?

    Let’s hear from folks who have used both KLB and clay molds as I have.  I, personally find KLB more versatile and longer lasting and easier to store than clay molds. That’s why I want to explore the reasons that KLB is not more generally used.   Any others have ideas to share on this?

    #12924
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    You shouldn’t ask for feedback and then complain when you get it. Since you specifically asked for reasons people don’t use Kaiser Lee Board (KLB) you should have expected some criticism.

    Since you made the original comparison to clay molds, why is contrasting the high cost of KLB with the low cost of clay “supercilious” (which I had to look up – it means arrogant).  Both clay and KLB are materials that the artist has to make it into something to be useful. I many cases, KLB is easier to fashion and requires fewer steps to be finished.  But it is also nowhere as capable as clay with regards to potential form.

    Also, you say of ceramic molds that “they tend to wear out and break”. I have ceramic slumping molds that have been used weekly (or more often) for over a decade without failure. From my experience, ceramic molds fail when they are poorly made (rare in my experience) or mishandled and misused (more common).  Still, a mishandled ceramic mold is infinitely more durable than mishandled KLB.  If you disagree, try breaking a piece KLB with your bare hands – then try the same thing with bisqueware.

    Bottom line for me is that KLB is great stuff for the very limited applications where other, much less expensive materials do not work.  My experience is that those situations are exceedingly rare.

    As for moving your post to the “For Sale” forum, I remind you that this was the bulk of your original post:

    “We all use Kaiser-Lee board as our material of choice to create molds for our glass.    It is so easy to create molds for various pieces..they can be any size or shape we choose.  They can be reused over and over.  And the various pieces can be re-purposed constantly.    A clay mold has a specific shape and size and can only be used for that.  They tend to wear out and break.”

    That’s a plain and simple sales pitch.  This website is fairly unique these days in that we still allow people to post commercial listings for free – but only in the proper place.  Otherwise the valuable discussions get diluted with spam and the community suffers.  So what you see as “unfair” I see as “generous”.



    Paul
    FusedGlass.Org
    Helios Kiln Glass Studio
    PaulTarlow.com

    #12925
    GeorgiaWood
    Participant

    I’m a newbie here and was not familiar with the product to visited my friend Google.  There I learned of concerns about the particle dust and the caution about wearing a mask or resperator,  at which point have decided to purchase ceramic molds instead.  I’m in no position to be advising anyone, just stating what are important criteria for myself.

    #12926
    Shereen
    Participant
    I was given a three pack of KLB boards last year as part of a contest I won for my work..  I wore a mask to cut one to the shape I wanted  (a drop out mold) which broke after the first use.   The other two sat on my shelf for about 3 weeks and a few things were put on top.  This caused huge dents in the KLB boards.   I buy BE molds and stack them with no problem, I can use them over and over with one kiln wash.  I don’t mind paying 60.00 for a mold that i can use for years however I don’t like molds i have to handle with kid gloves.
    #12927
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Georgia –

    It is pretty much impossible to fuse glass with zero respiratory risks. The good news is that the risk is very manageable.

    All fiber products (including shelf paper) and shelf primer produce ariborne particules that are unhealthy to breath. I consider a high quality respirator (rated N99 or N100) and a HEPA vacuum filter mandatory studio equipment.

    Paul



    Paul
    FusedGlass.Org
    Helios Kiln Glass Studio
    PaulTarlow.com

     

    #12928
    wordana
    Participant

    Kaiser Lee Board lends itself to more organic shapes. It’s great for pieces with defined lines, but you would have to be a pretty good carver to get a nice convex sushi platter or rounded bowl with a stable bottom.

    I also agree that the material is pretty easy to bang up, and those “bangs” show up in the finished product. Again, if you are going organic, this isn’t an issue.

    That being said, I need to work with it more. I have several pieces I bought a few years ago and have done only a few projects. It’s nice for “building things”, and has potential if you are looking to create your own texture tiles but don’t want to work with clay.

    Dana W.

    Jester’s Baubles Fused Glass Designs

    http://www.jestersbaubles.com

    #12929
    GeorgiaWood
    Participant

    Thank you, Paul.  I have a great resperator and will add it to my glass working area.  I’ll check the rating on it tonight.  This is a full canister resperator, is that the type you mean?

    #12930
    wordana
    Participant

    An N95 or P100 will work fine for glasswork (when particles are involved).

    Dana W.

    Jester’s Baubles Fused Glass Designs

    http://www.jestersbaubles.com

    #12931
    thomas decker
    Participant

    I agree with Paul  plus with a ceramic mold you get a much nicer finish on the bottom of your piece. I find  KL board to be to rough a texture,

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