Schedule for firing thompson acrylics for glass

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  • #9218
    Marg MacNeil
    Participant

    I have a 2x2in  COE 96 black piece with a hummimgbird painted on with the thompson acrylic enamels. I want to fire first as single layer to burn off binders and then cap and full fuse. Any suggestions for schedules. I fired others before capping before prefiring and all turned black and lost the image.

    Any suggestions appreciated

     

    Marg

     

    #10790
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Marg –

    Can you tell me more about the Thompson enamels – are you sure you mean "acrylic"?

    I use Thompson powdered enamels a lot – but I want to make sure we are talking about the same things.

    Paul



    Paul
    FusedGlass.Org
    Helios Kiln Glass Studio
    PaulTarlow.com

     

    #10791
    Marg MacNeil
    Participant

    Hi Paul

    No it is thompsom acrylic enamels made for glass, I bought it as a kit on the delphi site. Just didn’t come with any kind of explainations so I ruined the first 2 so thought I would get some help. They are listed on the thompson site as well.  They first came out with the watercolor ones than not to long ago introduced the  acrylics in tubes.

    Marg MacNeil

    Sydney, NS Canada

    http://www.caperglasscreations.com

    #10792
    glassartguy
    Participant

    Marg, I have a feeling that the binders are getting "caught" under the cap. Have you tried prefiring the painted glass first, then capping?

    Glassartguy

    #10793
    Marg MacNeil
    Participant

    Thanks I hope that is what happened. I currently have the piece in a small jewellry kiln fired to 1200 and  have turned off the kiln so it is now cooling. Hope it is successful. Then I will cap. Will let you know how it turns out.

    Marg MacNeil

    Sydney, NS Canada

    http://www.caperglasscreations.com

    #10794
    Marg MacNeil
    Participant

    Hi Folks

    Still having problems with acrylic paints from Thompson. They say you can use as normal paints, can mix colors put on thin or buttery thick. Am finding that i am removing bottom layer everytime I try to put on heavy.

    So here is my question. want to do fine animal paintings on glass. What would you suggest as best enamels to use. All will become jewelry, most are on black glass so colors need to be vibrant. Would be nice if could be done in one or 2 firings and need to be capped.

    Any suggestions. Also don’t want to put lots of money into it until we find the right enamels

    Thanks

     

    Marg MacNeil

    Sydney, NS Canada

    http://www.caperglasscreations.com

    #10795
    glassartguy
    Participant

    Marg,

    I have to confess that I have only used Thompson enamels a couple of times. When friends or students brought in something that they wanted to try. I use the Glassline products a lot. One reason is that they are made by the Clay Art Center down in Tacoma Wa. and I like to support local companies, when I can. I like then because of the boldness of the color and ease of use. I’ve also used their paper with great success. A product that I have used for years is called Sattelite-Unique glass paint. They come in a whole bunch of colors and have worked well for me. I made a color chart by painting¬† three stripes of paint on a piece of float glass. Letting that dry then painting two of the stripes a second time then one stripe a third time. So I had one, two and three layers of paint. I then fired the whole thing and posted it on the wall over a printed page that had the colors names on it showing through. I aways do that with frit, the paper, everything so I know what the products look like when fired. Satelite paints are a bit muted and some colors don’t work well when painted thick (reds, big supriise). But I have used them with a lot of success and they are pretty predictable. I also sometimes use a couple of different products together. If the fusing temps are different I just fuse the higher one first and refuse the lower ones second. Hope you find this information useful. Don

     

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