New to fusing and completely addicted

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  • #9841
    Mothsgal
    Participant

    Hello!  I’m writing to introduce myself….I’m new to this site and to fusing.  I am a self employed artist painting murals, furniture and anything else that will sit still long enough.  I also make custom ceramic tiles and painted ceramic tiles, sinks and other fixtures for clients.  I’ve been doing this for 25 years and I had my first fusing experience by accident when I was experimenting in my kiln many years ago and had a very fun accident. It ruined the piece I was working on but the glass was very fun.  I didn’t get another chance to work with glass until I took a class about 6 months ago and now I’m completely hooked.

    I’ve made several pieces so far and I’ve been learning so much.  I’ve decided to dedicate some serious time to fusing and actually make a glass studio in the corner of my basement.  I have a Scutt kiln with a kiln master controller that I use for my ceramic work that I plan to use (for now) for my fusing….I know, you’re all cringing and I can hear the “ugh”s from here…but it’s what I have so I’ll have to work with it for now.  It has been in storage for a year as our basement is under construction.  I plan on bringing it home and setting it up this week.  Any advice?  I’m wondering if putting fire brick around the perimeter and letting the heat spill over the top and block the heat coming diretly from the elements would be helpful?  I know I’ll have to do some experimenting and lot’s of note taking.  I’ve been taking my pieces to the studio where I took the class and I’d rather be in control of my pieces and responsible for my own losses rather than paying someone else fuse them the way they want them fused.

    I also have been using Spectrum 96 glass because that’s what the studio has but I’m thinking of switching to Bullseye glass (for all the great colors) which is 90COE.  Is there any difference between the two when it comes to fusing?  I know they can’t be mixed so I would have to switch out all the glass (use up the 96 that I have).

    I’m a “jump in with both feet and see what happens” kind of artist so I’m very excited about this new adventure…and I’m already addicted!

    Thanks for letting me introduce myself.  I am very excited about finding this site!

    Kathy Jackson

     

     

     

     

    #12629
    Stephen Richard
    Participant

    ….. I have a Scutt kiln with a kiln master controller that I use for my ceramic work that I plan to use (for now) for my fusing…. I’m wondering if putting fire brick around the perimeter and letting the heat spill over the top and block the heat coming diretly from the elements would be helpful?”

    Yes this is the recommended method for side fired kilns.

    “…..I also have been using Spectrum 96 glass because that’s what the studio has but I’m thinking of switching to Bullseye glass (for all the great colors) which is 90COE.  Is there any difference between the two when it comes to fusing?  I know they can’t be mixed so I would have to switch out all the glass (use up the 96 that I have).”

    They both fire similarly.  S96 reaches full fuse at a slightly lower temperature than Bullesye; the annealing temperatures are only a few degrees apart.  The S96 is thinner than Bullseye, so is more prone to dogboning if you do not have enough volume (i.e. sometimes two layers of S96 is not enough to prevent it).  They both are good fusing glasses, but htere is more support for Bullesye.

     

    Stephen Richard

    blogs at: http://www.verrier-glass.blogspot.com/ and  http://www.glasstips.blogspot.com/

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