Mica

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  • #9847
    HaleyB
    Participant

    I have tons of cosmetic grade mica. Each has a full ingredient list. Does anyone know which ingredients either do work well, or don’t work at all?

    I’ve used mica in lots of applications, but I’m new to glass. I use fumed silica as a medium when I use mica to tint paints and resins, it will keep the mica from settling out. I don’t think it will work for fused glass, is there something people use with mica to help keep it mixed? (dispersal agent). Is cmc a thickener only or does it also work this way?

    #12643
    aeshep
    Participant

    I’m fairly new to mica but love it. Although I can’t address the cosmetic ingrediant or CMC question hope the following helps:  I have used it with Thompson’s Klyr Fire and a badger sprayer for a lovely, even coating. (You can use stencil for designs).  I’ve also mixed it with Klyr Fire and coated fiber paper & blanket and used them as inclusions.  I love that it stays the same color (unlike metals that change color/texture according to heat, thickness and reactions to other materials). Lemme know if you want more info and I’ll try to pitch in.  :-)

    #12644
    HaleyB
    Participant

    I’ve run two kiln loads testing micas, one of my favorite finds is with two that actually do fade out. They leave behind great texture and help details in molds stay crisp.

    Every copper I’ve tested has stayed a nice color and the various grits have various effects.

    What micas do you use?

    #12645
    aeshep
    Participant

    Interesting.  I haven’t done casting (only fusing & slumping) but experimenting can be fun when there’s time/money for testing  :-)  I find that even with the best planning there’s always an element of “testing” since it seems the technical demands of every design vary widely.

    I believe I’ve ordered my mica from DelphiGlass.com.  I’ve used “Super Bronze”, “Inca Gold”, “Super Sparkle” and “Magna Pearl Silver”.  After reading on the web and in books by those with extensive experience I decided to stick to what is known to survive in the kiln.  (I do have Pearlex and Mona Lisa Metal powders but not for kiln use so you’d have to test those yourself  :-)

     

    #12642
    HaleyB
    Participant

    Thanks, I am torn over just buying the ones others have found work and testing my far too extensive supply on hand. However I know I can use them up as bat/glass separator. Mica works great for that! Or I can donate to my favorite art teacher. Choices

    Someday I’ll do a spreadsheet on the coloring agents so I can see if there are any patterns. There must be.

    #12646
    aeshep
    Participant

    By all means, test away!  Just save your sanity and rely on the published results from reliable professionals to guide you.  I’m sure the rest of the glass working community would be grateful to hear back about the specifics.

    While I’ve read that mica makes a great separator it seems a shame to use it when kiln wash does the job.  Good to know you have it on hand in case you run out, though. If you dabble in other art forms (like works on canvas with acrylics and mediums) sounds like you’d have a large palette of choices  :-)

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