kiln wash issues

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  • #9971
    mhemingway
    Participant

    The recent wash applied to my shelf seems to be lifting and cracking easily. Only the 2nd time I have applied it to the shelf as I am new to this fusing world! I also applied it to some bottle molds that don’t seem to be holding up so well. One edge of the bottle comes out rough. Wondering if I did something wrong. And for the molds that have alot of texture, can I remove the wash that was applied and use the spray instead? It is my understanding that once you commit to using the spray, you cannot go back to applying the wash.If I remove the wash that was originally applied (just once), can I use the spray? thx!

    #12948
    wordana
    Participant

    The old kiln wash needs to be removed before applying new. If not, you’ll see flaking as you report. That may be what has happened.

    Yes, once you use BN, the kiln wash will likely not “stick” unless the piece is heavily sanded.

    Rough edges could occur for a variety of reasons. You can use a scythe stone or diamond hand pad to smooth it out.

    Dana W.

    Jester’s Baubles Fused Glass Designs

    http://www.jestersbaubles.com

    #12949
    GeorgiaWood
    Participant

    I’m new to this also.  My experience to date has been with classes, where we did not prepare molds.  Is it the opinion of those knowledgable, that once product is superior to the other? 

    #12950
    wordana
    Participant

    Both have their uses. BN will leave less texture on the back of a piece at full-fuse temps (so will Thinfire or Papyrus). However, at slumping temperatures (i.e., in a mold), there’s less texture picked  up to begin with. BN is good for texture molds where the texture from kiln wash might interfere with the design (that being said, I KW most of my texture molds). Primo kiln wash is great for texture molds — it’s quite thin and not grainy like Bullseye KW.

    The advantage of a kiln wash like Bullseye is that it’s much cheaper, and in my experience, it stays on better. BN usually has to be applied before each firing (as does Primo), and you have to be careful of disturbing the BN when putting the glass in/on the mold. A kiln-washed mold can last for many, many firings.

    Dana W.

    Jester’s Baubles Fused Glass Designs

    http://www.jestersbaubles.com

    #12951
    GeorgiaWood
    Participant

    Thank you, Dana.  There is so much to learn before I actually feel competant enough to do this on my own.  My interests are mainly in pieces similar to the lovely item on your web site, and a ring is the first mold I’ve purchased. 

     

     

    #12952
    wordana
    Participant

    Thanks for the kind words. There *is* a lot to learn, but luckily there are good resources in books and the internet. After that, you just have to jump in and try it!

    Dana

    Jester’s Baubles Fused Glass Designs

    http://www.jestersbaubles.com

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