kiln wash

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  • #9610
    sed81650
    Participant

    We have a new glass kiln at the non-profit studio I attend.  My question is about the kiln wash to use for the shelves and the kiln wash to use for molds.  Should we use two different primers?   I have been using primo primer for both in the past.  I hate the residue this primer leaves.  Should I be bringing my high temp to a lower temp for a longer period of time to eliminate this?  Is there any way to prevent the residue completely other than using high fire paper?  Thank you.

    Susan

    #11990
    Stephen Richard
    Participant

    Susan,

    More information is required to help answer your question.  Where is the residue left? What temperature are you using?

    I use the Bullseye kiln wash, as it has good high temperature performance.  The Primo is easy to remove.  Depends on what you want – there always is a trade-off.

    Stephen Richard

    blogs at: http://www.verrier-glass.blogspot.com/ and  http://www.glasstips.blogspot.com/

    #11991
    sed81650
    Participant

    It has happened at home on a small 120 volt kiln at 1425 degrees and it has happened in a big kiln at 1480 degrees.

    #11992
    Stephen Richard
    Participant

    I still don’t know where the residue is left.  These temperatures 770C and 804C are fire polishing and full fusing temperatures, so I guess you are casting in these moulds.  Others have done this kind of thing successfully, so maybe you need to get back to the manufacturer to see what their recommendations are.

    If the residue comes off easily, then you are in luck, if it sticks then I wonder if you are renewing the kiln wash each time.  When kiln wash is taken above about 720C, it changes composition, making it stick to the glass in the next firing.

    Stephen Richard

    blogs at: http://www.verrier-glass.blogspot.com/ and  http://www.glasstips.blogspot.com/

    #11993
    sed81650
    Participant

    The residue is at full fusing.  If I have two sheets of glass that I am fusing together and the bottom sheet is opaque, it seems to have more of a chance to have a kiln wash residue that is very difficult to get off,  It has also happened with transparent glass but not as much. If I am full fusing into a mold with frit sometimes the finished product has small spots where the kiln wash sticks.  I had understood that primo primer was much better than other kiln washes but I am having these issues and am curious what other people are doing to prevent this.  When I have a clean non-primed shelf, I give it 4-5 coats of kiln wash as recommended.  After the inital firing if the shelf is still in good shape I will renew the kiln wash with 1-2 coats as recommended by manufacturer.  I do remove the kiln wash residue when it shows wear and start fresh.

    #11994
    Becki
    Participant

     The particles in Primo are much finer than most kiln wash and settle very quickly.  Are you stirring and mixing the wash before each application? 

     

    Becki

     

    #11995
    katmontminy
    Participant

    I’. having a problem with kiln wash also. I don’t know what brand it is but it sticks to the back of my jewelry. I fire fast to 1425 for 10 minutes and then do a fast cool. Should I fire up slower? or cool down slower? I mix the kiln wash 4:1 which was what I was told when I bought my kiln. It worked great the first time but I’ve been having trouble ever since. I am just firing small pieces right now and I have to take a brillo pad to the back of my pieces to get the kiln wash off. I would love to start firing bigger pieces but want to work through this problem first. Any suggestions?

     

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