glass polishing vs fire polishing

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  • #9081
    precev
    Participant

    I have a platter that I slumped and it has two small , what looks like scratches.  Should I try polishing these out somehow of fire polishing the platter.  Thanks

    #11255
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hand polishing glass – while it can give you wonderful results — is a lot of work. 

    You can sometimes “cheat” and fire polish a slumped piece by putting it back into the mold.  The trick is to heat the piece up to about 1000° F, hold there long enough to make sure the piece is heated throughout, then go as fast as possible to fire polish and as fast as possible back down to anneal.  The idea is that you melt the surface without giving the interior of the glass enough heat to deform or pick up texture on the back side.  The initial soak at 1000° F is to ensure you don’t thermal shock the piece.

    As with all cheats, failure is a possibility :)



    Paul
    FusedGlass.Org
    Helios Kiln Glass Studio
    PaulTarlow.com

     

    #11256
    sue
    Participant

    I need to learn some hand polishing techniques to improve my finished pieces. I do not even know where to start or what to use to do this. I’ve done a ot of searches on glass polishing and have found no answers. Can you help me get started?

    Thanks, Sue

    #11257
    petra kaiser
    Participant

    I found when you pre-polish a piece with a fine grid sponge or grinder – or you sand blast it, polishing can already happen at around 1250 F. I show some basic polishing techniques in my introduction to glass fusing – essentially it is always the same – no matter if you are using hand tools or machinery – you start out with 400 grit sanding material and work you way up to 2000 grit and the final polish would be a slurry you are making with water and cerium oxide – which takes forever. I love fire polishing – for the final step. The slurry makes a lot of mess and takes forever.

    have fun

    petra

     

    petra kaiser – http://www.kaiserlee.com

     

    #11258
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    If you have and scratches or surface irregularities (and you probably do), starting with 400 grit is going lead to a lot of unnecessary work (i.e. an exceptionally long time with that grit).  Starting with something coarser — like a 120 grit — will require extra steps (at least a 220 grit before the 400) but the overall time will be significantly shortened.



    Paul
    FusedGlass.Org
    Helios Kiln Glass Studio
    PaulTarlow.com

     

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