Fusing Kokomo Glass

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  • #9346
    mosaic
    Participant

    I wonder if anyone has  fused with Kokomo glass.  I teach mosaics and since they are only 45 min. from me I have a lot of Kokomo glass.  Last week I spoke with them and was told all their glass is fusable and compatable with system 96. 

    I just got a Paragon Quickfire 6 a couple days ago and have not had the nerve to use it yet.  I am not understanding just how to know how long or what tempature I should use and how to do it.

    I have had a  microwave kiln for some time now and tried some Kokomo Glass in it yesterday  I used millefiori that is suppose to be coe90 and it turned out just fine. 

    Would it be safe to use the Kokomo glass in the quickfire or should I stick with glass that I know is sys96 until I know more about fusing?  Could it mess up my kiln if I use it with some sys96? 

    Oh and some encouragment to get me fusing with the Quickfire instead of the micro kiln would be great, I am so afraid of messing up or causing a fire. 

    Thanks so much,

    Deborah

    #11429
    Vernelle
    Participant

    I have had the Quick Fire 6 for several years.  love it.  I think you will quit using the microwave kiln after using it once.  You will get a lot better results.

    People who ruin a kiln usually fire too hot, past 1600-1700 degreesF and the glass becomes liquidy and run off the shelf.

     

    Just take a small piece of the Kokomo  and test it.  I have seen it slumped for lamps.  Some times “regular” glass will change colors after firing (like regular Spectrum wispys) and not be pretty.  That’s why you test regular glass.

     

    Have fun with you new kiln.

     

    Paul has some tutorials at the top of the page.  A really good book is Brad Walker’s Comtemporary Warm Glass.   Brad has tutorials on his website also.   http://www.warmglass.com     If you are using Spectrum 96, you can go to their website and see suggested temperature ranges to fire to.

    Vernelle

    #11430
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Kokomo is not even consistently compatible across their own products – you should test every piece if you intend to fuse it.

    Manufacturing compatible glass is not something that happens by accident – Bulllseye tests every 10th sheet in a production run because even a single batch will yield incompatile glass at the front and back end of the run.



    Paul
    FusedGlass.Org
    Helios Kiln Glass Studio
    PaulTarlow.com

     

    #11432
    mosaic
    Participant

    Well I did it and now I love my new kiln LOL.  2 kiln loads today and the only problem I had was the kiln wash or what ever it is called stuck to most of my fused pieces.  So far the kokom is turning out fine.   I will be careful to test it before doing anything important with other glass though.

    I am actually very proud of what I got done today.  Thank you for encouraging me to just do it. I hope I can pull myself away from the kiln and get all my Christmas mosaic orders done on time. 

    I do think I will use the microwave kiln for testing, will be much faster that way.

    Debbie

    #11431
    Stephen Richard
    Participant

    If the kiln wash is sticking, you may be firing too high.  What temps are you using and how long are you soaking a the top temperature?

    Stephen Richard

    blogs at: http://www.verrier-glass.blogspot.com/   and  http://www.glasstips.blogspot.com/

    #11433
    mosaic
    Participant

    Well I am setting the BCP-1 on 21/2 then proping the lid for about 10 min. until it reaches 750 degrees,  Then I close the lid and set the timer for 35 min.  It is about 1800 degrees when I turn it off and prop the lid again so it can get back to room temp.  I wait about an hour and take my items out of the kiln once it gets to about 200 degrees.

    That is what I was told to do by the person I bought the kiln from.  I used it again yesterday and the same thing happened, all but 1 item has kiln wash stuck to it.  It isn’t to darn easy to get off either. 

    Is there a difference between the kiln wash used for ceramics and glass?  I bought the kiln wash at a ceramic shop.  She has the same kiln I do and said it was what she used but she doesn’t know anything about glass fusing.

    I appreciate any help on this.  I have a list of questions to ask here soon LOL. 

    #11434
    Stephen Richard
    Participant

    So you are firing very fast and very high.  I have missed what glass you are firing but 1800F is -by my conversion – about 180C [324F] higher than needed for all except float.  No [blank, blank] wonder your kiln wash is sticking.  I don’t know of any kiln wash that would stand up to these temperatures. Generally, the ceramic batt washes are a bit coarser than that made for glass, but are essentially the same composition otherwise.

    I wonder what your glass is looking like. A puddle, I guess.  :-)

    Look at the Bullseye site technote 4

    http://www.bullseyeglass.com/education/

    This will tellyou a lot about how glass reacts to heat.  Also look at the tutorials on this site for information on firing.

    Stephen Richard

    blogs at: http://www.verrier-glass.blogspot.com/   and  http://www.glasstips.blogspot.com/

    #11435
    mosaic
    Participant

    Thank you all for your answers, I was following the instructions given to me by the person I purchased the kiln from.  Since I was clueless I just figured she would know since she had the kiln for a year. 

    I am now attempting to keep the kiln around 1450 to 1500.  It is not easy to control the temp with the power control box, it only has numbers on it like 1 2 3.  I was told to put it on 2 1/2 so I have been setting it on 2 and adjusting up or down from there.  Once it reaches the right temp it only takes about 20 min. to fuse.

    Actually Stephen, my glass was not in puddles, not sure how I got lucky but they looked very nice for a novice at kiln working.  This is a lot less work then mosaic but sure is more frustrating!

    Thanks again for all the help, I think I am starting to get the hang of it.

    Deborah

    #11436
    WackyPup
    Participant

    A couple years ago you wrote that you were fusing Kokomo glass. I have some in my studio, and have just started fusing glass (using a microwave) and wondered how your projects came out. I would love to be able to use some of the glass that I already have.

    Thanks for any help and info that you can share :)

    Liz

    #11437
    mosaic
    Participant

    Hi Liz,

    I still use Kokomo for some projects and have kept a lot of notes on what works and what doesn’t.  The reds, yellows, pinks & oranges all strike way to often so I don’t bother with any of those colors in the kiln.  Once in awhile a green will “split apart” for some reason at regular fusing temps but it does ok at tack fuse.  The 10% rule works great with most of the Kokomo, so I can use a small amount of dichro,coe 90 or fusible glass with the Kokomo and not have a problem.  Right now my student’s are making wind chimes, hummingbird feeders & yard ornaments out of Kokomo and not having any problems with it at all.  I have some I made a couple years ago that are still holding up real well.

    I  use it a lot with glass paints, mica, copper foil and rubber stamps and it turns out fantastic.  Much less expensive than using regular fusible glass and I get the same effect.  Makes wonderful Christmas ornaments, sun catchers & wind chimes.  I just stick with using one color and a clear cap with I need it, like if I use the mica or copper and even the pieces that are a couple years old are still looking good with no stress.

    In a pinch I have used it to make frit for glass clay and it has worked out just fine, couldn’t tell a bit of difference.  It has all been a matter of trial and error, but to me most fusing is. Wink

    If you have the Kokomo I say go ahead and experiment with it.  You will learn fast enough which ones work and which don’t. Keep good records and don’t get discouraged.  It’s probably easier for me since I can just run up to the factory and buy the .75 a pound scrap glass so I don’t feel like I have wasted much if something doesn’t work out.

    Right now I am using a a lot more slag glass from the old glass factories that use to be around here.  A lot of it comes up in people’s yards in all kinds of beautiful colors or along the river that I can pick up for free & we have a shop that sells it for $1.50 a pound in every color you can imagine.  It fuses up in the most amazing ways and I love that I am using recycled glass.

    Good luck playing with the Kokomo, please let me know how it goes.  If I can help in any way don’t hesitate to ask. Above all, have fun, you will outgrow that microwave kiln real fast, I have upgraded 3 times already and looking at a larger kiln in the next few months.

    Deb

    #11438
    WackyPup
    Participant

    Thanks Deb for all the info! Do you have any pics online? I would love to see what you have done. Do you know if Kokomo is food-safe? I just bought it recently, if that makes any difference.

    Thanks again

    Liz

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