difficult slump with dogboning

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  • #9463
    geodesia
    Participant

    I wonder if somebody has some tips for me for a slumping mold that’s giving me fits. After an unsatisfactory first try, I tried again with a very slow approach, with a schedule that’s helped me to get a pretty good candle bridge without a dogbone effect, but it didn’t help on this mold. Pictures below. This is two layers of Tekta fused together. Schedule as follows:

    400.1050.

    50.1200.40

    full.900.45

    100.700

    Despite going so painfully slowly, still plenty of sucking in as you can see. Somebody suggested to me that I needed to treat this more like a drop ring schedule–to get more flow of the glass and less stretch deformity, but wouldn’t I stil get this dogbone thing on the way up to higher temps? Here’s the mold and then the result:

    here's the moldAny thoughts? I’ll be grateful!

     

    –Katherine T.

    #11718
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    This is common on narrow rimmed, (relatively) deep molds.

    I don’t think there is a good way to avoid this – but I would be glad to be proven wrong.



    Paul
    FusedGlass.Org
    Helios Kiln Glass Studio
    PaulTarlow.com

     

    #11719
    Stephen Richard
    Participant

    I don’t know who/what company made the mould, but it seems to me to be an innapropriate mould. unless it was supplied with a first stage mould.  Deep moulds usually need a shallower 1st slump mould before putting into the second, final stage mould.  Slow slumping – as you did – usually helps and so does low temperature slumps – they take a long time though.  Although I have been slumping for a long time, I would not attempt one like this even now.

    Stephen Richard

    blogs at: http://www.verrier-glass.blogspot.com/   and  http://www.glasstips.blogspot.com/

    #11720
    geodesia
    Participant

    Thank you Paul, and Stephen. I was hoping there was a magic solution. It seems there is just not enough glass on the side rim to cover for the stretching deformity of the slump. I’m thinking of trying one more time, with an extra layer of glass perhaps contour fused on the trouble spots, just to see what difference it might make. But otherwise, I think I’ll give this one up. Life is short and kiln time limited!

     

    –Katherine

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