Deep Slumped Bowls

Home Forums Glass Fusing General Fusing Discussion Deep Slumped Bowls

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #9318
    windfire
    Participant

    Hi,

    I have been trying to make some of those wonderful deep slumped bowls I see on the website but I never seem to get the height.  I have adjusted my slumping schedules and use a deep slumping mold.  Help!  What is the secret?

     

    Thanks,

    Debby

    #11167
    Stephen Richard
    Participant

    The secret is to slump in stages.  Ist a shallow one, then a medium one and then the deep one.

    I have seen descriptions of placing whiting in the deep mould for the first slump, emptying some and doing a second, and then the final slump without whiting.  This saves having to buy three moulds.

     

    Stephen Richard

    blogs at: http://www.verrier-glass.blogspot.com/   and  http://www.glasstips.blogspot.com/

    #11168
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    In addition to Stephen’s good advice, you can also get a deep slump by using a drop ring and cutting off the “hat brim”.  That is how this piece was done:

    https://fusedglass.org/index.php?q=gallery&g2_itemId=1131

    This can be done slumping into the air (traditional drop ring) or by cutting a custom ring out of fiber board to fit the mold of you choice.  After slumping, the rim is cut off and the edge of the piece polished. 

    Lastly, many time you can slump directly into the deep mold twice.  The first slump will almost certainly be lopsided – but the piece can then be repositioned for a second slump.

    Paul



    Paul
    FusedGlass.Org
    Helios Kiln Glass Studio
    PaulTarlow.com

     

    #11169
    windfire
    Participant

    Thanks to both of you for the advise!  Laughing I have several pieces to try this on.  Hopefully I will get one good enough to put in the galley.

    Debby

     

    #11170
    Quotentials
    Participant

    Good info!  I have done something similar to filling the mold, by filling a small shallow bowl mold with kilnwash and slumping to make round coasters.  Turned out great.  I had fogotten all about that.  Can the kilnwash still be mixed with water and used (traditionally) after a firing like that?

    Paul, after cutting the top of the dropring off, is the edge coldworked?  Or can it be firepolished in some way?

    #11171
    Vernelle
    Participant

    If you are slumping into a deep mold filled with kilnwash or whatever…..that plugs up the hole in the bottom of the mold for air to escape. What am I missing here?

    Thank you,
    Vernelle

    #11172
    Stephen Richard
    Participant

    ” I have done something similar to filling the mold, by filling a small shallow bowl mold with kilnwash and slumping to make round coasters.  Turned out great.  I had fogotten all about that.  Can the kilnwash still be mixed with water and used (traditionally) after a firing like that?”

    Yes.  Although I prefer to use the cheaper whiting.

     

    Stephen Richard

    blogs at: http://www.verrier-glass.blogspot.com/   and  http://www.glasstips.blogspot.com/

    #11173
    Stephen Richard
    Participant
    “If you are slumping into a deep mold filled with kilnwash or whatever…..that plugs up the hole in the bottom of the mold for air to escape. What am I missing here? Thank you, Vernelle “

    You are slumping at bubble squeeze, or lower, temperatures: the form is relatively shallow: and unless you pack the powder, it will allow some air to disperse through it.

    Stephen Richard

    blogs at: http://www.verrier-glass.blogspot.com/   and  http://www.glasstips.blogspot.com/

    #11174
    BetNew
    Participant

    Betsi – Avondale, AZ

    I curious how deep a drop your mold has.

    And, Paul, how deep was the drop for the Tapestry Cup?

    Thanks!

    #11175
    Anonymous
    Inactive

     >> And, Paul, how deep was the drop for the Tapestry Cup?

    I’ve done them different depths – mostly in the 6 – 8″ range.



    Paul
    FusedGlass.Org
    Helios Kiln Glass Studio
    PaulTarlow.com

     

    #11176
    debemerick
    Participant

    “I have seen descriptions of placing whiting in the deep mould for the first slump, emptying some and doing a second, and then the final slump without whiting.  This saves having to buy three moulds.”

     

    What is Whiting???

     

    thanks


     

     

    The ideals that have lighted my way time after time and have given me new courage to face life cheerfully, have been Kindness, Beauty, and Truth.

    —Albert Einst

    #11177
    Vernelle
    Participant

    People who do stained glass in lead use a putty that is a little messy. They use a whiting which is a white powder, I think calcium carbonate, to sprinkle on their project to absorb some of the moisture of the putty and clean the glass.

    Vernelle

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

People Who Like Thisx

Loading...