clear glass

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  • #9422
    DeDa
    Participant

    Can you use clear window glass and clear picture glass as a base for projects?

    #11627
    Vernelle
    Participant

    Clear window glass is called float glass which has a COE of 82.  It won’t mix with 90 or 96.  (Bullseye or Spectrum)

    #11626
    Stephen Richard
    Participant

    I just can’t help being pedantic here.  The CoE of some float glasses is in the range of 82 +/- 3.  So quite a big range.  Also some is made in the region of 90.  As the manufacturers do not care what the expansion is, there is no way of knowing exactly what a particular manufacturer is doing.  Minor changes in the mix of materials will affect the coe and they just don’t care.

    In any case, you are right that the float glass will not be compatible with any other glass, and often not with itself if it comes from an other batch or manufacturer.

     

    Stephen Richard

    blogs at: http://www.verrier-glass.blogspot.com/   and  http://www.glasstips.blogspot.com/

    #11625
    glassartguy
    Participant

    One of the assignments that I give the cadets at the National Guard Youth Challenge Academy at which I teach Glass Art and Careers is a clear glass fusing project. I cut a bunch of 8 x 6 (or so) sheets of float glass which is given to me by a local glass shop (yes! FREE). The art concept is LINE. They design, cut and glue pieces (Klyr-fire) of glass from the same piece that they use as the base glass. I then tack fuse the pieces. There is a glowing line on the edge of the pieces that have been fused onto the base glass. Those lines delineate the image. Some of the images are starlingly bueatiful. The cadets think the project is lame until they get the fused piece back, then they understand. Try it, you will be suprised at how easy and cool the pieces look.

    #11624
    silverchakra
    Participant

    This sounds like a fun project to try. I have read on other glass sites that you can use float to fuse with other glass, but some posts here say no. If I’m understanding you correctly, you are using one piece of glass cut up (rather than mixing with different pieces of float) so that they will be the same coe, is that right? Anyway, I would like to try this. Thanks for sharing the idea!

    #11628
    nenaviovicente
    Participant

    I have read on other glass sites that you can use float to fuse with other glass, but some posts here say no.

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    #11629
    Stephen Richard
    Participant

    You have to be concerned about compatibility.  If you want to use glass from different manufacturers, you have to test the combination yourself.  You will need to determine the annealing point(s) and observe them.  You need to ensure that your annealing is adequate, so you can distinguish annealing from incompatibility stress.  You will need polarised filters to determine what degree of stress is in the fired piece.   This takes time.  The manufacturer has already done it for you and this is reflected in the cost and ease of use.

    It has been reported that float glass from different float manufacturers has proved incompatible.  Certainly anything other than bottle glass and float glass will be incompatible, and most of the bottle glass prooves to be incompatible with float.  Float is a relatively difficult glass to work with.

     

    Stephen Richard

    blogs at: http://www.verrier-glass.blogspot.com/   and  http://www.glasstips.blogspot.com/

    #11630
    nenaviovicente
    Participant

    If I’m understanding you correctly, you are using one piece of glass cut up (rather than mixing with different pieces of float) so that they will be the same coe, is that right?

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    #11631
    Vital-Spark
    Participant

    You can fuse float glass but one side is tinned. The tin is picked up because the glass “floats” on molten tin during manufacture. So once you identify the tinned side which will not fuse you can use it as described. Same as irid really it doesn’t fuse on irid side.

    #11632
    Stephen Richard
    Participant

    Well actually you can fuse float glass on the tin side.  If you put the tin on the bottom of each of a two or more layer piece, you will have tin in contact with the air side and it does fuse.  If you put tin to tin it will still fuse, but it is a very bad idea, as any further forming of the glass will show tin bloom.

    Stephen Richard

    blogs at: http://www.verrier-glass.blogspot.com/   and  http://www.glasstips.blogspot.com/

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