Scrap Glass Project

Our tutorial for this scrap project first appeared as an article in the Summer 2010 issue of Glass Craftsman.


 

One of the great things about kilnforming is that glass scraps never end up in the trash.

Unlike stained glass, where each new project produces a lot of small bits only a mosaic artist could love, fused glass allows us to take the trimmings from one project and melt them together into new work.


Fused glass bowl from scrap glass!

 

But despite that promise of near zero waste, over time we all still manage to collect buckets of fusible glass scraps.  Perhaps one reason we are discouraged from using all those odd shaped bits and pieces is that scrap projects rarely manage to escape the appearance of something made from leftovers – an artistic afterthought.

That’s where this project tutorial – which uses only scrap fusible glass – is different.  As you can see in the photo above, this scrap project doesn’t look like leftovers at all.


Scrap Glass Project

Wow how very cool! I usually make paperweights with small scrap glass but this is a no brainer! I'm all over this! A while ago I bought a plastic stand with 30 drawers in it, some smaller some larger drawers (available at your bigger hardware & Dept. stores) and I put the same color scrap glass in the drawers (obviously smaller pieces) this made it easier for me to make 'paperweights' but this is so much cooler than paperweights my boyfriend already barked he wanted one! What a great idea, I'll show you mine when I'm done!

Clear glass.

I was telling someone about this process and he said I should add clear glass to make sure the colors are visible. Any thoughts?

I personally like lots of

I personally like lots of clear glass in any pot melt as it makes the other colors stand out more distinctly.  Also, I use not more than 1% black glass as it tends to melt into the other colors and dominate.  In Paul's VERY HELPFUL tutorial here (what a gift he is to the Fused Glass community!!) the schdule doesn't seem so hot that it melts the colors together as much as mine have in the past.  Also adding a thick piece of clear on the bottom, while contributing to bubbles and requiring a much slower schedule with a longer soak, makes a much more impressive result.

 

 

Windows listen attentively for the sound of broken glass.

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